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Archerfish can discriminate human faces. Our paper published in Scientific Reports has been featured by 140 news outlets and is currently ranked #5 in 17,566 papers published in Scientific Reports (Altmetric score 1366)


National Geographic featured research presented at Behaviour2015 in Cairns.


PhD Graduations
July 2015: Amira Parker, Chris Braun and Cait Newport
July 2014: Sara Van-Eyk


Feb 2015: Cait Newport wins Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship to work at the University of Oxford


Contact Us

Siebeck Lab
School of Biomedical Science
The University of Queensland
St Lucia QLD 4072 Australia
u.siebeck@uq.edu.au

 
 

Welcome

The central research interest of my lab is visual perception, visual learning and cognition. We are also interested in the positive ('secret' visual communication) as well as negative (DNA damage) effects of exposure to UV radiation. Our model animals are fish (coral reef fish and Archerfish).

Projects

Feature-1

Visual communication using ultraviolet patterns increases the chances of survival as, like humans, predators are UV blind. Detection of UV signals requires a UV sensitive visual system.

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Feature-1

The larvae of many benthic fish species spend time in the pelagic environment before settling on a reef. Can they use visual cues to find back to the reef?

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Feature-2

Environmental ultraviolet radiation has positive (vitamin D activation, secret communication etc.) as well as negative consequences (DNA damage, cell death). What protection mechanisms exist preventing DNA damage?

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Feature-1

We are using a range or paradigms derived from human psychophysics to assess cognitive abilities and function.

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Feature-1

Fish surveys are traditionally done in situ by divers quantifying fish abundance, diversity and biomass along belt transects. FishNet allows the extraction of fish data from survey imagery.

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Feature-1

The power to recognise individuals of a species requires significant image and pattern discrimination abilities. We challenge the general assumption that abilities such as face recognition require highly specialised processing areas found only in animals with a neocortex

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2016 Siebeck Visual Neuroethology Lab
Web design: Diana Kleine Photos: Uli Siebeck, Maxi Eckes